About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
MSNBC 15
LANGUAGE
English 15
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15
a plea to allies of the palestinians in particular. the president of egypt, the prime minister of turkey said if you would like to see a two-state solution in the near future, a palestinian state next to israel this has to deescalate now. the president expressing this fear if hamas doesn't stop rocket attacks on to israel's soille he fears left unsaid is israel may retaliate and turn in to a ground war and then the idea of a two-state solution in the peace process will be in the way distant future. obviously the middle east peace process has been on hold for quite sometime. he was asked about this trip will include a visit to myanmar which is also known as burma. he was asked whether it was too soon. a lot of human rights violations taken in burma and he wouldn't have gone if aung san suu kyi didn't think it was right for him to go. a few notes to point out. one is during -- before the press conference he and secretary clinton were visiting a mondastermonastery. they were joking about getting prayers over the fiscal cliff. the president at the press conference was asked what about what k
spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since 1967 and really since not l
, between israel and the palestinians, since egypt's leadership has changed. and we know that egypt has a different reaction to this than they did under president morsi than they had in the past under former president mubarak? >> reporter: absolutely. on a few different fronts. one, the leadership here, it's currently aligned with the one that runs egypt. and president morsi comes from that. and the more important one, for the past several days they've been trying to mediate between the palestinian faction in israel. they reached a truce, but that truce didn't hold for long. more importantly, israel is trying to resume a bit of a leadership role. yesterday, they lobbied to secure the security council. and also they convened with the arab league to try to put an end to the barrage of fire. some for its part are calling on egypt to sever ties with israel. that would be a major setback for the united states because the israeli/egyptian peace treaty has been a cornerstone of u.s. policy in the middle east. >> ayman, we'll be checking in with you all day, i imagine. thanks very much. >>> mov
of an effort to engage egypt trying to act as a middle man or not much of a concerted effort to the netanyahu government's part to build up the palestinian authority in the west bank. was this really necessary at this point for israel to act like this? >> the israelis were getting hit by quite a number of rockets, and it's within their judgment to defend themselves and take actions to defend themselves. there are facts here that make you wonder whether or not the israelis may have acted hastily? namely the fact that in addition to hamas there are other actors in the game here. a lot of people are al qaeda types firing the rockets. they consider themselves enemies of hamas. they are firing lots of rockets at israel, and israel is blaming those attacks on hamas because hamas is the regional power broker. i don't know if that's really going to progress ourselves forward. these kind of al qaeda splinter groups never stop firing rockets. hamas has no control over them. if there's a constant cycle where these groups fire a rocket to become a spoiler, israel retaliates and there's a clush of forces
to take advantage of the new arab spring balance of power, the muslim brotherhood in egypt, to leverage that possibility. israel has been watching for the last six to nine months hamas bringing in longer and longer range missiles from iran. i think they saw this as an opportunity of necessity to take those out, missiles that can now hit tel aviv and jerusalem. this is a real problem for egypt. you have a new government there that needs money from the united states. they don't want to be caught in a struggle between the struggle. for iran, this is a godsend. it takes world attention off their nuclear program and puts pressure on all the more moderate forces in the arab world, puts them at the head. and lastly, syria, couldn't be a better day for bashar al assad. no one is looking at the murderous campaign of assad against his own people. >> andrea mitchell, the diplomacy for president obama about to start a second term with all of the problems in the middle east. he's in bangkok this morning. he talked about his support for israel. >> there's no country on earth that would tolerate missi
is prepared to take whatever action is necessary to defend our people. >> while egypt's prime minister visited gaza today in a show of solidarity with hamas, israel agreed to pause attacks, but we keep hearing more coming from there, richard, your thoughts. >> look, it's possible this escalates, but it's hard for me to see how anybody benefits. israel got out of gaza -- israel's a first-world country, a first-world economy. it doesn't want rockets raining down in the middle of tel aviv. it would be like rockets raining down on rockefeller center. israel's way beyond this and wants to move beyond this. also, this brings into play the israeli/egyptian treaty and jordan. everything now -- >> so the question is, why did hamas choose to start firing rockets into israel the way they did? >> i think for hamas -- >> to start this? >> i think for hamas, it's station identification. this is what hamas does. this is how it differentiates itself but hasn't been able to deliver the goods at home to the palestinian people in gaza. this galvanizes its space. it shows the hamas, quote, unquote, is doing somet
is egypt's prime minister will make an unprecedented visit to the gaza strip on friday. he's leading a high delegation of cabinet officials to mediate and perhaps broker a truce between the israelis and palestinians but more importantly to express solidarity with the people of gaza who he says are now subject to israeli aggression. >> let me bring in nbc's martin fletcher in tel aviv. martin, senior u.s. officials told nbc news to expect more from israel later today. can you add to that information? >> reporter: well, yeah, the israelis are making it as clear as they possibly can they will do anything it takes to stop the palestinian attacks on israel and to make the southern cities of israel secure. the defense minister said today and he emphasized this, and we will do anything, and i repeat anything to keep those cities secure. the israelis are emphasizing repeatedly from different sources they'll do whatever it takes. when the americans warn that israel will do more this evening, they're echoing what the israeli spokesman said earlier. this is a very difficult night ahead. >> and martin,
rockets in any other way. of course there is some diplomatic activity going on, too, in egypt in particular, trying to organize a truce. only a 48-hour truce between israel and hamas. so there's a positive moves ahead going on trying to end this diplomatically. but not everybody is betting on that right now, alex. >> sounds like all the pieces are on the chess board for sure. thank you very much, martin fletcher. >> let's get some perspective on this crisis. joining me is military analyst general mccaffrey. is there a danger this could turn into a larger middle east war? >> no question. i think we're one step shorter of an all out ground operation in the gaza. i don't see how the israelis could top rate continued threat to huge parts of the civilian population. and then in the background, of course, we have the iranians and hezbollah on the lebanese southern border. the israelis are quite vulnerable to these rocket strikes. fit went to all-out war there would be significant israeli losses. >> all right, general, would the u.s. get involved militarily if this does escalate? >>
in egypt. is this conflict about to become something much more profound, prolonged, and serious? >> reporter: well, it certainly has the potential to, and it's important to emphasize really this chapter in a prolonged conflict between israel and the palestinians certainly has entered into a new dimension when it comes to the gaza strip. this isn't the first time they have exchanged this type of gunfire. in fact, we saw four years ago the operation that was unfolded, very reminiscent of what we're seeing now. that's the concern many palestinians have here. 1.5 million people in gaza bracing themselves for more violence. the concern is whether israel will launch a ground offensive. there is precedence for it. that's why many palestinians are fearful that in the coming days this can only get worse. a lot of people are questioning the effects of all of this. why is israel continuing to carry out these attacks if it has not been able to stop the rocket fire it set out to stop. when it launched the operation four years ago, it was precisely the same modus operandi for the same objecti
from iran that it basically needs to provoke the muslim brotherhood in egypt to be more supportive of it. perhaps it's iran wanting to deflect attention from syria. perhaps it's an effort by hamas to in effect bridle its credentials to prove to the palestinians on the west bank that its route is the best way to deal with israel. >> while britain and germany have both said hamas bears the brunt of the blame, mohamed morsi appears to lay some blame on the israelis. is he torn with his fellow islamists and the need to maintain the treaty obligations with israel? >> martin, if he isn't yet, he could be soon, and that's, of course, the real danger here. if this thing goes on just for a short time, then maybe we wind up okay. but if it goes on for days or weeks, like the 2008-2009 war that ambassador ginsberg referred to, then i think all bets are off as to just how long the egyptian regime can really sustain this stance of sort of being between the two. you know, in a broader sense, of course, the cease-fire that hamas had respected for a number of years never reflected a fundamental st
next door in syria. you have a different government in egypt and the morrisey government is reacting differently than perhaps the mubarak government did before. >> what's the short-term solution then? >> well, i think the danger for israel for example, it has a right of self-defense, but obviously if it decides to return ground troops to gaza the optics there work against israel in a much -- in a region that now is governed far more by populism than by authoritarianism. i think it has to make sure that its response is aggressive, tries to deal with the threat to israel's people, but doesn't go too far. >> let's talk about the united states' potential role. health care was president obama's defining achievement for his first term. when we look at a second term will the president look at middle east peace, the road map to peace might this be his big deal for his second term? does it need to be? >> i think that's part of the motivation here. you know, you have coming up the palestinian authority which of course controls the west bank but not gaza is preparing to try to move toward enhan
is a bedrock, as you know, of peace in the region. egypt has withdrawn its ambassador. is this peace treaty now in jeopardy? >> we hope not, and we think egypt can play a constructive role as it has in the past in persuades hamas to back down and mediating a peace the yippians. >> thank you very much and up thanks for being with us. aa very difficult day. >>> what political story will make headlines in the next 24 hours? that's next right here on "andrea mitchell reports." you won't find a "home rule" on every corner, a "stag provisions" down every block, or a "hugh and crye" in every town. these are the small businesses of america, and all across the nation they're getting ready for their day. hundreds of thousands of small businesses are preparing for november 24, a day to open doors, and welcome the millions of customers who will turn out to shop small. small business saturday. visit shopsmall.com and get ready. because your day is coming. starts with ground beef, unions, and peppers baked in a ketchup glaze with savory gravy and mashed russet potatoes. what makes stouffer's meatloaf best of
as a result of what happened with the film with egypt. he clarified that after more information came in, there was not a protest. >> general petraeus' testimony comes today the morning after cia acting director michael morell and james clapper the director of national int intelligence went before members of congress in two other hearings and hours after attorney general eric holder defended the decision not to bring members of congress into the loop sooner. >> we follow the facts. we do not share outside the justice department, outside the fbi the facts of ongoing investigations. we made the determination as we were going through the matter that there was not a threat to national security. >> let's jump right in and bring in our friday morning political power panel. we have jackie kucinich political reporter for "usa today", democratic strategist blake zeb and msnbc contributor robert trainum. great to have you all here. we just heard from congressman king earlier today saying the general was asked right off the top whether the affair had an impact on his testimony. he said no. they mov
in egypt. we have a civil war in syria impacting that entire area. i have to ask you about the air strikes to jerusalem. as martin fletcher mentioned, this did not happen. >> there's a large palestinian population in jerusalem, which is not quite the same number of arabs live in tel aviv. a fair number live in tel aviv, but a large number of arabs live in palestinian. it's the first time a rocket was fired into jerusalem for 40 years. it's what baffling. it absolutely has escalated issues, and it's definitely now emboldened israel's case we're trying to preserve peace in our own countryland. >> obviously, the loss of life, including children in gaza. when anyone hears the headline 13 dead, many of them children, we know the reaction. >> i mean, this turned into in 24 hours an increasingly bloody conflict. we saw photos and video coming out. there's dead children on both sides. >> absolutely. >> wrapped in shrouds. it's escalating and getting very precare yus for the entire region. >> thank you very much, jim. we'll see what the next 48 hours bringi brings us. president has start aid meetin
petraeus was traveling ing ing ing abroad, he was in egypt. the trip report, i don't know what sort of paperwork they filed. the only thing that surprises me in senator feinstein's tone is, our cia directors don't work for congress. they work for the president. and if there was anybody who should be receiving information about the travels of the cia director, it's the president and the national security counsel. congress has an oversight role, which is important. and that oversight -- >> but the context was the benghazi investigation that they are holding the hearings on. >> i understand that. it's just that there was a sort of -- i understand that, and given all the questions about benghazi, i'm glad that congress is looking at it. i'm just saying that over the last, you know, years, sometimes in statements by senior members of the intelligence committees, you get the feeling almost that they think the cia director and the intelligence community work for them, and they don't. >> well, they have oversight. and i think -- >> they have oversight, but there's a difference. >> but in th
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15